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James Hunter Six Wed 07/11/2018 8PM

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James Hunter Six Wed 07/11/2018 8PM
$63.60

Availability: In stock

Showtime 8:00 doors open 7:00pm There is a 6% handling fee included in the ticket price. Tickets are NOT MAILED, ALL TICKETS ARE WILL CALL AT THE DOOR

James passion for the music of the Fifties and Sixties never waned as he toiled for seven years as a signal locking fitter in Colchester, tending to a Victorian-era safety feature found in signal boxes. He put together his first band to play at the Colchester Labour Club; his first original song, the Muddy Waters-style Evil Eye, was composed in 1984 for a mostly-rockabilly compilation entitled Dance To It. In the early Nineties, Van Morrison was stopped at a London newsstand when a fan approached and began regaling him about this great unknown rhythm & blues singer he'd heard. Van went to hear James at a gig in Wales and subsequently hired him as a backup singer for several years of touring and recording. James appeared on Morrison;s live album, A Night in San Francisco (1994), and on the studio set, Days Like This (1995). But by 2003, James Hunter was 41 years old and without a record deal or a gig. His dreams of a career in music were rapidly fading. Steve Erdman had been a James Hunter fan for nearly 20 years, ever since the first time he'd seen James playing on the street in Camden. In late 2003, Erdman and his partner, Kimberly Guise, created GO Records to release a new James Hunter album. The sole purpose of the company was getting me recorded, says the singer. It was extraordinarily nice of them. Then came People Gonna Talk, and in its wake the reviews, the airplay, the award nominations, and loads of gigs. With the release of The Hard Way, James Hunter takes a giant step toward staking his place in the pop-soul pan¬theon alongside Sam Cooke and Jackie Wilson, Charlie Rich and Van Morrison. In his typically straight¬forward and self-effacing way, the singer told The Boston Globe: The history [of rhythm & blues] is so rich with great singers and performers. I'm just trying to tap into that vein and try to make music that is about love and romance and heartbreak all those great things that will fuel songs long after we \re here
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Showtime 8:00 doors open 7:00pm There is a 6% handling fee included in the ticket price. Tickets are NOT MAILED, ALL TICKETS ARE WILL CALL AT THE DOOR James passion for the music of the Fifties and Sixties never waned as he toiled for seven years as a signal locking fitter in Colchester, tending to a Victorian-era safety feature found in signal boxes. He put together his first band to play at the Colchester Labour Club; his first original song, the Muddy Waters-style Evil Eye, was composed in 1984 for a mostly-rockabilly compilation entitled Dance To It. In the early Nineties, Van Morrison was stopped at a London newsstand when a fan approached and began regaling him about this great unknown rhythm & blues singer he'd heard. Van went to hear James at a gig in Wales and subsequently hired him as a backup singer for several years of touring and recording. James appeared on Morrison;s live album, A Night in San Francisco (1994), and on the studio set, Days Like This (1995). But by 2003, James Hunter was 41 years old and without a record deal or a gig. His dreams of a career in music were rapidly fading. Steve Erdman had been a James Hunter fan for nearly 20 years, ever since the first time he'd seen James playing on the street in Camden. In late 2003, Erdman and his partner, Kimberly Guise, created GO Records to release a new James Hunter album. The sole purpose of the company was getting me recorded, says the singer. It was extraordinarily nice of them. Then came People Gonna Talk, and in its wake the reviews, the airplay, the award nominations, and loads of gigs. With the release of The Hard Way, James Hunter takes a giant step toward staking his place in the pop-soul pan¬theon alongside Sam Cooke and Jackie Wilson, Charlie Rich and Van Morrison. In his typically straight¬forward and self-effacing way, the singer told The Boston Globe: The history [of rhythm & blues] is so rich with great singers and performers. I'm just trying to tap into that vein and try to make music that is about love and romance and heartbreak all those great things that will fuel songs long after we \re here
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